Paisley unveils new video via NASCAR

Friday, May 20, 2011 – Brad Paisley will make a pit stop in Charlotte on Saturday to attend the NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race and unveil the world premiere his new video, Old Alabama, on multiple platforms, including SPEED, NASCAR.com and the world's largest HD video board at the Charlotte Motor Speedway.

With the single second on airplay charts, the video features NASCAR's Darrell Waltrip, Jeff Gordon and Rick Hendrick and Alabama. Paisley and his multi-talented guests contribute to a visual road trip down memory lane with Alabama music videos from the 1980s playing in the background as Paisley and Alabama perform. Images of Paisley are digitally composited into the original videos, making for a humorous visual. A collection of images of Gordon driving, Waltrip appearances and a special guest appearance by Hendrick capture the song. The video was shot on country roads in Charlotte and several takes took place at Hendrick Motor Sports Complex in Concord, N.C.

Old Alabama was directed by Jim Shea and produced by Mark Kalbfeld, who also directed and produced Paisley's award winning videos Waitin' On A Woman, Start A Band, When I Get Where I'm Going and Welcome To The Future.

During the 5-6 p.m. Eastern time slot, TV viewers can look for Paisley and an unnamed special guest from his video to be interviewed on SPEED. During this hour, a portion of the music video will be broadcast.

Immediately following the SPEED segment, the online premiere takes place exclusively on the SPEED broadband channel on NASCAR.com and can be streamed throughout the weekend.

Prior to the NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race start (9 p.m. Eastern on SPEED), fans on hand at the speedway will view the music video at approximately 8:50 p.m. on the world's largest HD video board.

Artist royalties from the digital single sales are being donated for tornado relief via the American Red Cross. The NASCAR Foundation launched NASCAR Unites through which the motorsports community is raising money in exchange for NASCAR Unites wristbands. To date, the NASCAR industry has raised more than $400,000 in support of tornado relief.

Paisley's new album, "This Is Country Music," a 15-track collection, with 12 co-written by Paisley, drops Tuesday. The Frank Rogers-produced disc includes guest performances by Carrie Underwood (the duet Remind Me), Don Henley ( Love Her Like She's Leavin'), Blake Shelton ( Don't Drink the Water), Marty Stuart, Sheryl Crow, and Carl Jackson ( Life's Railway to Heaven) and Clint Eastwood (the instrumental Eastwood).

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