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Krauss, Martin, Punch Brothers highlight IBMA festival

Wednesday, May 1, 2013 – The International Bluegrass Music Association announced Wednesday Alison Krauss, Steve Martin and the Punch Brothers will be among the acts at the newly-named Wide Open Bluegrass festival, to be held in Raleigh, N.C. Convention Center on Sept. 27-28.

Krauss will collaborate with Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Béla Fleck, Del McCoury and Tony Rice. Martin appears with the Steep Canyon Rangers Featuring Edie Brickell. Martin and Brickell released an album last week. The Punch Brothers are making their first IBMA appearance.

Tickets for the Wide Open Bluegrass festival will go on sale May 15 for IBMA members and May 29 for the general public. Bluegrass fans can join IBMA in order to take advantage of early ticket availability and member discount rates, by calling 1-888-GET-IBMA or going to www.ibma.org.

Serving as onstage "mistress of ceremonies" for the Wide Open Bluegrass festival is banjo player/songwriter Abigail Washburn.

The two-day festival is part of IBMA's annual World of Bluegrass event: bluegrass music's annual industry gathering and family reunion. Held for the first time in Raleigh, World of Bluegrass runs from Sept. 24-28. The International Bluegrass Music Association - IBMA - is the professional trade organization for the global bluegrass music community.

Friday night's performance from artists Bush, Douglas, Fleck, Krauss, McCoury and Rice offers a reunion of recipients of IBMA's inaugural International Bluegrass Music Awards, presented in 1990. Though they're friends and colleagues of long standing, this appearance marks their first time together on stage in more than 20 years. Mark Schatz, Bass Player of the Year in 1994-1995, will be standing in for the late Roy Huskey, Jr., who took top IBMA honors on Bass from 1990-93.

"With a new host city on the horizon for our annual World of Bluegrass gathering, it was the perfect time for IBMA to assemble a spectacular, one-of-a-kind artistic lineup to celebrate the move," said IBMA Executive Director, Nancy Cardwell.

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If we've learned anything over the 7 years that have passed since the last Alison Krauss & Union Station record (2004's "Lonely Runs Both Ways"), it's that Krauss doesn't necessarily need her band for success. And the same can be said for the band regarding Krauss. During the hiatus, Krauss scored a mega-hit with "Raising Sand," her collaboration with Robert Plant from 2007. At the same time, multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Dan Tyminski and Dobro »»»
A Hundred Miles or More: A Collection CD review - A Hundred Miles or More: A Collection
The liner notes for the new collection of songs by Alison Krauss gives notice that, unlike the last collection ("Now that I've Found You" in 1995), this one showcases Krauss alone, far from Union Station, the band that first brought her into the spotlight. She's been a recognized solo artist for a while now. There's no doubt that Krauss has traveled far from her bluegrass/traditional roots. But for anyone who needs proof of that, this collection is a good argument - she »»»
Lonely Runs Both Ways CD review - Lonely Runs Both Ways
Over the past decade, Alison Krauss + Union Station have created and fine-tuned an approach that can deliver restrained, moody ballads and mid-tempo songs, hard-edged bluegrass and traditional material and lithe instrumentals with equal helpings of skill and conviction. The result is one of the most distinctive and compelling sounds in popular music, a verdict ratified by a slew of awards - Krauss herself owns more Grammies than any other female artist - and invitations to join all kinds of »»»
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Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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