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Comedian Tim Wilson dies at 52

Thursday, February 27, 2014 – Tim Wilson, 52, a comedian who combined stand-up comedy and music, died at 52 of a heart attack on Wednesday in Nashville. Wilson released nine albums on Capitol Nashville.

Wilson was born Aug. 5, 1961 in Columbus, Ga. He started his recording career for the Southern Tracks label in Atlanta with "Waking Up the Neighborhood" in 1994. Member sof the Atlanta Rhythm Section played on his early recordings.

He co-wrote Jeff Foxworthy's 1996 single "Redneck 12 Days of Christmas and several parodies for the 1980s comedy duo Pinkard & Bowden. Among his songs are ""Garth Brooks Ruined My Life" and "The Jeff Gordon Song."

Wilson leaves a wife and two children.

CD reviews for Tim Wilson

Certified Aluminum, His Greatest Recycled Hits, Volume 1
Somebody needs to tell Tim Wilson that a CD can hold over 75 minutes of audio. There are 22 tracks here but this album clocks in at barely a bit over 30 minutes. It seems a lot longer though, mainly because over half of the tracks are "Uncle B.S." bits, and even if you find these historic distortions amusing, 12 of them is just way too many. In the space not taken up by Uncle B.S. there are such classics like "Chucky Cheese Hell" and "First Baptist Bar and Grill" and clunkers like "Beer Belly Blues. »»»
Getting' My Mind Right
Tim Wilson says that his job is to "holler and scream about stuff that makes me mad." Fortunately for comedy fans, a lot of things grab his goat, including Al Gore, Abraham Lincoln's father, gun control, English people, Egyptian people and especially white people. He's intentionally selling himself short however. Ranting isn't all he does, even though he's very good at it. For one thing, he can sing. If you enjoy bad puns and country music, you'll love "Nashville Name-Dropping School" ("He's »»»
It's a Sorry World
Anyone who's been fortunate enough to catch Tim Wilson live or find one of his small label recordings might find his major label debut a bit jarring. For one thing on the musical numbers, Wilson actually has musical accompaniment (and even back-up singers on tunes like "First Baptist Bar and Grill") which is a shock when you're used to just a guitar and Wilson's ragged baritone. It's incongruous compared with the non-musical comedy bits too, giving the album a sort of half-live, half-studio feel. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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