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Anderson strikes gold

Wednesday, April 22, 2015 – John Anderson is back.

He will release his first album in nine years, "Goldmine," on May 26 on his own label, Bayou Boys Music. Anderson wrote or co-wrote 12 of the 13 tracks. Anderson produced the record with long-time friend and producer Joe Spivey.

"With 'Goldmine', I thought, first off, I'm going to take my songs into the studio and make a record like I think it ought to be made, without all those other influences," Anderson said, "I'm more pleased with the sound of this record than I have been in a long time."

"I'm really proud of this album. At this point, it's just for me and the fans. A best case scenario for me is if the fans that have loved our music and supported us for so many years know 'Goldmine' is out there, and how to get it, I'll be happy."

The first single, "I Work a Lot Better," will be shipped to radio on May 11 and will be available for download on iTunes, Amazon and other major digital retailers. The rocking mid-tempo track is in the style of previous chart-topping hits, such as "Money in the Bank."

"It was actually Josh Turner's idea," Anderson said. "He is a fine young man, a great talent and a real asset to modern day country music. Josh and I have written several songs together, and it's always a pleasure to write with him."

Songs on the CD are:
1. Freedom Isn't Free (John Anderson/James C. Hicks Sr.)
2. Magic Mama (Merle Haggard)
3. Back Home (John Anderson/Jimmy Stevens/Jeff Farr)
4.Goldmine (John Anderson/Josh Turner)
5. Happily Ever After (John Anderson/James C. Hicks Sr.)
6. I Work Alot Better (John Anderson/Josh Turner)
7. I Will Cross O'er the River (John Anderson)
8. Louisiana Son Of A Beast (John Anderson/Bill Emerson/Jody Emerson)
9. Holdin' On (John Anderson/Jimmy Stevens)
10. Song the Mountain Sings (John Anderson/Buddy Cannon)
11. On And On And On... (John Anderson/Jimmy Fortune)
12. Don't Forget To Thank the Lord (John Anderson/John Rich)
13. You All Are Beautiful (John Anderson/James C. Hicks Sr.)

Raised in Apopka, Fla., Anderson grew up listening to both rock and traditional country. In 1977, Anderson signed with Warner Brothers Records and had his first major hit in 1980 with Billy Joe Shaver's, "I'm Just an Old Chunk of Coal (But I'm Gonna Be a Diamond Someday)." Other hits include the classic "Wild and Blue" released in 1982, and "Swingin," the number 1 Billboard Country single co-written with Lionel Delmore that would lead Anderson to garner the CMA Horizon Award.

Anderson has produced 23 albums and released more than 60 singles (26 of which charted in the Top 10). He was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame last year.

Anderson is currently touring throughout the U.S. Most recently, Anderson collaborated with Keith Urban for the taping of "ACM Presents: Superstar Duets," a CBS special featuring country luminaries and chart-topping artists. The two-hour event will air on Friday, May 15. On July 25, he will join Urban again for a performance at Cheyenne Frontier Days in Cheyenne, Wyo.

More news for John Anderson

CD reviews for John Anderson

Years CD review - Years
John Anderson has one of the best, and one of the most recognizable singing voices in country music, and he's in top form on "Years." It's expertly produced by Dan Auerbach (of The Black Keys) and David "Fergie" Ferguson, and Anderson and Auerbach wrote all of the songs, sometimes with the help of noteworthy songwriters like Pat McLaughlin and Larry Cordle. It's a nearly perfect, 10-song album, too. A few of its songs address aging head-on, opening with »»»
Bayou Boys CD review - Bayou Boys
Unlike some country music stars have when they reached a certain age, John Anderson chooses to not rest on his laurels. Instead the 60-year-old member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame continues to release new recordings - although not as frequently as in his chart-topping heyday of 1980-1995 - featuring largely original numbers. While radio airplay may not be as once plentiful - 5 number ones, and over 20 top 20 single appearances - Anderson continues to produce songs that sound like they »»»
Bigger Hands CD review - Bigger Hands
Listening to John Anderson's new CD is taking a trip back in time, to an era in country music history (not that long ago, believe it or not) when talent was all that mattered. You didn't have to be drop-dead gorgeous or Playgirl-centerfold hunky to be a country star because how you sounded was more important than how you looked on CMT. It's a testament to Anderson's talent that he's managed to survive this long into the video age despite being, well, he's no hotty. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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