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The Steel Wheels grow "Wild"

Tuesday, January 31, 2017 – The Steel Wheels, the Virginia bluegrass, country, folk and Americana band, is out with "Wild As We Came Here" on May 5.

Produced by Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive, Elephant Revival) in his rural Maine farmhouse turned recording studio, all four band members -Trent Wagler (banjo, guitar), Eric Brubaker (fiddle), Brian Dickel (upright bass), and Jay Lapp (mandolin) - recorded for about 10 days. This will be their ninth release.

The band started in 2004 with Wagler, Dickel, and Brubaker studying at Eastern Mennonite University in Harrisonburg, Va., about an hour from Charlottesville. (All four members of the band grew up in Mennonite families.) Wagler and Dickel were in a punk/alternative band until acoustic music lured them.

Wagler soon started writing songs and learned flat-picking. Dickel learned how to build guitars. They briefly played as a duo before Brubaker joined on fiddle. Lapp eventually came on board after getting to know the band from the local folk circuit. In 2010, following a variety of EPs and LPs, the ensemble officially branded itself as The Steel Wheels, a tip of the hat to steam-powered trains, industrial progress, and the buggies of their Mennonite lineage.

Tour dates are:
March 15 - Nashville, IN - The Pines
March 16-17 - Kansas City, MO - Folk Alliance
March 18 - Broken Bow, NE - Kinkaider Brewing CO
March 19 - Des Moines, IA - Des Moines Social Club
March 20 - Madison, WI - High Noon Saloon
March 21 - Kalamazoo, MI - Bell's Brewery
March 22 - Columbus, OH - The Refectory
March 22 - Fayetteville, AR - George's Majestic Lounge
March 23 - Little Rock, AR - South on Main
March 26 - Baton Rouge, LA - Dyson Listening Room
April 7 - Lewisburg, WV - Carnegie Hall
April 8 - Poughkeepsie, NY - Hudson Valley Bluegrass Association
April 9 - Cazenovia, NY - The Nelson Odeon
April 28 - Charlottesville, VA - Jefferson Theater
April 29 - Decatur, GA - Eddie's Attic
April 30 - Wilkesboro, NC - Merlefest
May 4 - St. Louis, MO - Off Broadway
May 5 - Lawrence, KS - The Bottleneck
May 6 - Wichita, KS - Orpheum Theatre
May 7 - Hastings, NE - The Lark
May 8 - Cedar Rapids, IA - CSPS Hall
May 10 - Minneapolis, MN - Dakota Jazz Club
May 11 - Chicago, IL - Old Town School
May 12 - Goshen, IN - Goshen College
May 13 - Cleveland, OH - GAR Hall
May 27 - Galax, VA - Blue Ridge Music Center
June 7 - NYC - City Winery
June 8 - Cambridge, MA - Club Passim
June 9 - Chestertown, MD - Garfield Center
June 10 - Annapolis, MD - Rams Head
July 14-16 - Red Wing Roots Music Festival
July 29-30 - Floyd Fest

More news for The Steel Wheels

CD reviews for The Steel Wheels

Over the Trees CD review - Over the Trees
Ostensibly a bluegrass band, The Steel Wheels continue to explore some of the most inventive percussive sounds and surprising textures of any band loosely labeled in that genre. The quintet hail from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, but journeyed north to Maine to again record with noted producer Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive, Elephant Revival). Kassirer also produced their 2017 "Wild As We Came Here." Steel Wheels is band leader Trent Wagler (lead vocals, »»»
Wild As We Came Here CD review - Wild As We Came Here
The Steel Wheels are one of those bands that are keen to convince their listeners that theirs is not your granddaddy's bluegrass. Like Punch Brothers, Infamous Stringdusters and the Steep Canyon Rangers, the band they seem to parallel the most in terms of sound and style, The Steel Wheels are less fervent about the particulars and given to providing more attention to melody and nuance. So while there's a decided emphasis on a pluck and a strum, the songs surge with booth soothing tones »»»
No More Rain CD review - No More Rain
It is sometimes an unwise decision to look back at music written years ago, and try to breathe new life into them. Perhaps there was a reason these songs never inspired a budding audience or career at that time. Well, that is just what The Steel Wheels have done with their new release "No More Rain," but after one listen many may wonder what took so long for these songs to find their way out once again. Of the 12 songs released here there is only 1 cover, which just so happens to open »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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