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Richey remains a treasure

GRAMMY Museum, Los Angeles, April 2, 2018

Reviewed by Dan MacIntosh

Kim Richey may not fit comfortably into the Nashville country music mold, but with the smattering of fans gathered, she may have felt like queen for the day. As always happens during these intimate showcases, GRAMMY Executive Director Scott Goldman interviewed Richey about her songs and career, and primarily focused on her fine new album "Edgeland." After which, Richey picked up an acoustic guitar and performed a short set.

Goldman suggested the title is a sly commentary on Richey's solo music. Although she lives in Nashville, there's as much jangle-pop and folk-rock in Richey's solo music to leave her just a hair edgier than most mainstream country artists. When asked to name her musical influences, Richey quickly rattled off names like Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne and - wait for it - The Grateful Dead. No Patsy Cline. No Loretta Lynn. Nevertheless, Richey is respected by songwriters, both inside and outside Nashville, for her consistent emotional intelligence.

Richey sang a few older songs, including "A Place Called Home" and "Straight as The Crow Flies," before bringing out Chuck Prophet to sing and play guitar on songs they wrote together for "Edgeland." One of these, "Pin a Rose," is a slow burning rocker worthy of pop chanteuse Aimee Mann. "Whistle on Occasion" was sung has a duet, over a country-esque acoustic guitar picking pattern. See? Richey can sing good old country when she feels like it.

It was a little sad that Richey didn't fill the relatively small hall. However, she's like a rare treasure only few find. But to those that have discovered Kim Richey's music, it's something they'll always treasure.