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Opening for Little Big Town is...

Monday, March 2, 2009 – Little Big Town has opening acts for its A Place to Land tour - four of them. The bands ranging from North Dakota to Nashville and Kentucky were picked by fans in a nation-wide contest.

The winners are Josey Greenwell from Bardstown, Ky.; 32 Below from Fargo, N.D.; Corinne Chapman from Nashville and J.W. Cudd from Nashville.

Throughout March, each band will open the show at a different stop on the tour. The musicians were winners of a four-week competition on Eventful. More than 300 country musicians across the nation vied for the opportunity to appear with LBT.

Eventful's Demand service powers the viral tools for both performers and fans to ignite their friends and family to join the Demand. The bands posted widgets, banners and blogs on their official websites and social networking sites including Myspace.

"I am very excited to have this opportunity to open for Little Big Town and so thankful towards Eventful for putting on such a great competition," said Greenwell. "I am truly honored to be in the top four and looking forward to getting my music heard, but I am mostly excited about being followed by such incredible talent like Little Big Town. For them to be where they are in their careers and extend an opportunity like this is just huge. I think my style of music will complement theirs very well and generate an exciting show. Thanks to Eventful, Little Big Town and all of the fans that voted for giving me this chance to live out a dream."

"Congratulations to the winners and their fans for voting and making this event a success!" said Philip Sweet of Little Big Town. "We are excited to see up and coming talent emerge and are grateful to share our fans and our platform with them in this unique way. Each of the four winners is very different from each other and has something special to bring to the show. We're a band that believes in perseverance and building a strong base of fans in a grass roots way, and this is a cool way to nurture that spirit of independence by creating this opportunity."

More news for Little Big Town

CD reviews for Little Big Town

Nightfall CD review - Nightfall
Little Big Town gets billed as a country music vocal group, but "Nightfall" plays out more like a four-headed singer-songwriter effort. Many of these songs hearken back to some of the best '70s introspective songwriter efforts. The album opens with "Next to You," which builds from a gentle meditation, into a full-on anthemic ode to the comfort and strength of fidelity. "Questions" interestingly finds an ex asking questions via song lyrics, which she can never »»»
The Breaker CD review - The Breaker
Anyone who missed Little Big Town's remarkable 2012 Unplugged performance on CMT should seek it out online. When they sing their monster hit "Pontoon," four hypnotic voices combine to harmonic perfection with no studio tricks - pick from any of the microphones, and it works as the song's lead vocal. But now that the group has ascended to the upper rung of stardom, different challenges arise. How do you compete with yourself fresh from a Grammy for Best Country Song »»»
Pain Killer CD review - Pain Killer
For some, listening to Little Big Town will be an act of searching for something at least half as catchy as "Pontoon," yet without success. Whenever a group creates such a fantastically memorable single, the prospect of following it up successfully can be a bit of a handicap. With that said, though, "Pain Killer" is a pretty good pop-country album, as pop-country albums go. Although Little Big Town has never been known to be rockers, the rollicking "Save Your Sin" »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Evans brings the cheer – What's a country song without drinking? Morgan Evans seems to have gotten the missive loud and clear as a good chunk of his songs incorporate libations into the mix. And when the Australian-bred singer isn't confronting drinking, he's dealing with matters of the heart, but in keeping with the positive attitude he purveyed, love is most... »»»
Concert Review: Lambert smiles, dances the night away – Miranda Lambert didn't perform "Tin Man," one of her best, but also one of her saddest songs during this Wildcard tour stop. It's a song sung from the perspective of one who is sad that she has a heart that can be broken. That's not the current condition of Lambert's heart, though. She's apparently in a good... »»»
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