Ely-Ronstadt single sees light of day, 27 years later

Friday, December 12, 2014 – Joe Ely's Rack 'Em Records will release a long-lost duet single Linda Ronstadt on iTunes Monday.

Written by R.C. Banks, "Where Is My Love" has been an Ely staple for years, but it was first recorded with Ronstadt in 1987 in a Los Angeles studio with Mitch Watkins on guitar, Bill Ginn on keyboards, Jim Keltner on drums and Tony Marisco on bass.

The recording was never released. Ely and Ronstadt recently visited about the recording and decided it was time the world heard the recording.

Ely recently released his first novel, "Reverb: An Odyssey."

In October, Ely released "B4 84," an album Ely recorded in 1983 using an early Apple II computer.

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CD reviews for Joe Ely

Love in the Midst of Mayhem CD review - Love in the Midst of Mayhem
Over the past 14 years, Joe Ely has earned a reputation as one of the forebears of that unique branch of Americana borne from the Great State of Texas. Both individually, and as part of the super band, The Flatlanders, he's carved out a career as an essential insurgent, one who once kept company with The Clash while establishing some decidedly cool credentials of his own. While the title might suggest otherwise, the hastily released "Love in the Midst of Mayhem" finds »»»
The Lubbock Tapes: Full Circle CD review - The Lubbock Tapes: Full Circle
When you hear some artists' early demos, a phrase that might come to mind is, 'Well, they had great potential.' You won't say that, though, when you hear Joe Ely's demos for his first album, and some songs that later appeared on his third album. No, with "The Lubbock Tapes: Full Circle," you hear an artist that arrived fully formed and in his prime. You can hear Ely's struggle to graduate from talented Texan, to Nashville (star hopeful) with the downhearted »»»
Panhandle Rambler CD review - Panhandle Rambler
Joe Ely shows no signs of slowing down on his ninth release. Writing all but two of the dozen songs over the past three or four years, Ely is at his best here, painting pictures with words of the Texas that he calls home. The title belies the scope of this album, with its contents illustrating a panorama of Texas landscape and citizenry (legal and otherwise), including those from just south of the border as well. Standouts abound: "Four Ol' Brokes," a tale of poker, train yards, »»»